Naming The Parts Of The Body In Danish

Would you like en hånd with that?
May 28, 2020
Naming The Parts Of The Body In Danish

There’s a lot of ingredients that go into the secret sauce of conversation. One that’s kind of hard to skip? You need a basic set of vocabulary that’ll allow you to name the various concepts, sensations, and verbs that animate your experiences. And learning to name the body parts in Danish is more fundamental to your fluency than you might think.

Next time you need to tell someone they’re a pain in your neck, that you have a headache, or that you can’t get that song out of your head, first make sure you find the natural translation for the idiomatic expression you’re trying to use (because translating it word-for-word probably won’t make sense) and then draw on this vocabulary to help.

Here are some basic terms you’ll need to talk about body parts in Danish. Just click the play button to hear how they’re voiced by a native speaker.

Body Parts In Danish

a part of the body — en kropsdel

a foot — en fod

a hand — en hånd

an arm — en arm

a head — et hoved

a finger — en finger

eyes — øjne

a face — et ansigt

a leg — et ben

a body — en krop

a mouth — en mund

a nose — en næse

a knee — et knæ

an ear — et øre

a tooth — en tand

a neck — en hals

a back — en ryg

a stomach — en mave

Sentences Involving Anatomy

I have a headache. — Jeg har hovedpine.

He broke his leg. — Han har brækket benet.

I feel sick and my stomach hurts. — Jeg har kvalme og ondt  i maven.

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Author Headshot
Steph Koyfman
Steph is a writer, lindy hopper, and astrologer. She’s also a language enthusiast who grew up bilingual and had an early love affair with books. She has mostly proved herself as a New Yorker, and she can introduce herself in Swedish thanks to Babbel. She also speaks Russian and Spanish, but she’s a little rusty on those fronts.
Steph is a writer, lindy hopper, and astrologer. She’s also a language enthusiast who grew up bilingual and had an early love affair with books. She has mostly proved herself as a New Yorker, and she can introduce herself in Swedish thanks to Babbel. She also speaks Russian and Spanish, but she’s a little rusty on those fronts.

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