How To Talk About Transportation In Norwegian

Sadly, there is no dog-sledding vocab on this list.
June 17, 2019
How To Talk About Transportation In Norwegian

The idea of getting lost in another country can have a romantic appeal to it. Going off in the Norwegian wilderness with nothing but your intuition and rough lay of the land can feel like the beginning of a Jack London story (one of the ones where the protagonist doesn’t die, of course). Still, in reality you probably want to know how to actually get around. Being lost is a lot less fun when your phone is dead and you can’t communicate to any of the passers-by. You might want to do some preparation beforehand, then. Fortunately, we’ve rounded up the basics of Norwegian transportation vocab to get you on your way (literally!).

Click the play buttons to hear how the words and phrases are pronounced.

Norwegian Transportation Vocab And Phrases

General Navigation

on the left — på venstre side

on the right — på høyre side

straight ahead — rett fram

Excuse me, can you help me? — Unnskyld, kan du hjelpe meg?

Excuse me, where is the tourist information office? — Unnskyld, hvor ligger turistinformasjonen?

 

Traveling By Plane

a plane — et fly

an airport — en flyplass

a terminal — en terminal

a luggage — en bagasje

a luggage tag — en adresselapp

hand baggage (carry-on) — en håndbagasje

a flight — et fly

a departure — en avgang

to check in — sjekke inn

a security check — en sikkerhetskontroll

to board — gå ombord

to land — lande

 

Traveling By Train Or Bus

public transportation — kollektivtrafikk

a bus — en buss

a train — et tog

a subway — en t-bane

a tram — en trikk

a train station — en togstasjon

a ticket — en billett

a platform — en perrong

a stop — en holdeplass

a passenger — en passasjer

an inspector — en kontrollør

a timetable — en ruteplan

to catch — rekke

to validate — stemple

 

Traveling By Car Or Bike

a car — en bil

a driver — en sjåfør

a windshield wipers — en vindusvisker

a seat belt — et bilbelte

a key — en nøkkel

a driver’s license — et førerkort

to drive — kjøre

to park — parkere

a breakdown — en motorstopp

a bicycle — en sykkel

a cyclist — en syklist

a helmet — en hjelm

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Author Headshot
Thomas Moore Devlin
Thomas grew up in suburban Massachusetts, and moved to New York City for college. He studied English literature and linguistics at New York University, but spent most of his time in college working for the student paper. Because of this, he has really hard opinions about AP Style. In his spare time, he enjoys reading and getting angry about things on Twitter. He's spent a lot of time trying to learn Spanish, and has learned a little German.
Thomas grew up in suburban Massachusetts, and moved to New York City for college. He studied English literature and linguistics at New York University, but spent most of his time in college working for the student paper. Because of this, he has really hard opinions about AP Style. In his spare time, he enjoys reading and getting angry about things on Twitter. He's spent a lot of time trying to learn Spanish, and has learned a little German.

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