How To Count To 100 In Italian

Counting in Italian is an important skill to master when learning the language. Here’s a breakdown of how the numbers work, from zero to cento.
August 29, 2018
How To Count To 100 In Italian

When you’re learning a new language, your focus should first be on mastering the words and phrases that you’re most likely to use in real life. A crucial bit of knowledge that sometimes gets forgotten is numbers, which can mean the difference between ordering two scoops of gelato and ordering twenty scoops (not that we’d judge either way). Let’s take a look at the basics of how counting in Italian works and the most important numbers for you to know.

Counting From Zero To Twenty In Italian

Counting in Italian is relatively straightforward and works in a similar way to Spanish or English counting. Here are the numbers from zero to twenty — press the play button to hear how they’re pronounced.

Zero — zero

One — uno

Two — due

Three — tre

Four — quattro

Five — cinque

Six — sei

Seven — sette

Eight — otto

Nine — nove

Ten — dieci

Eleven — undici

Twelve — dodici

Thirteen — tredici

Fourteen — quattordici

Fifteen — quindici

Sixteen — sedici

Seventeen — diciassette

Eighteen — diciotto

Nineteen — diciannove

Twenty — venti

The Rest Of The Tens

Now, let’s move on to the remaining foundational numbers, from which we can build every number between 21 and 100.

Thirty — trenta

Forty — quaranta

Fifty — cinquanta

Sixty — sessanta

Seventy — settanta

Eighty — ottanta

Ninety — novanta

One Hundred — cento

Putting It All Together

The numbers in between the “tens” listed above are very simple to construct. Just like in English or Spanish, you just affix the digit between one and nine to the end of the tens number. For example, twenty-one in Italian is ventiuno, which is just a combination of venti (“twenty”) and uno (“one”). There’s no “and” or dash or space in between — just combine the numbers. That’s all there is to it! And the numbers continue like this all the way up to one hundred. Facile! (That means “easy!”)

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Author Headshot
Dylan Lyons
Dylan is a senior content producer, overseeing video and podcast projects for the U.S. team. He studied journalism at Ithaca College and previously managed social media for CBS News. He’s currently pursuing his MBA part-time at NYU Stern. His interests include podcasts, puppies, politics, alliteration, reading, writing, and dessert. Dylan lives in New York City.
Dylan is a senior content producer, overseeing video and podcast projects for the U.S. team. He studied journalism at Ithaca College and previously managed social media for CBS News. He’s currently pursuing his MBA part-time at NYU Stern. His interests include podcasts, puppies, politics, alliteration, reading, writing, and dessert. Dylan lives in New York City.

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