How To Count To 100 In Turkish

Counting in Turkish isn’t hard at all. You only need to memorize 20 words to be able to name 100 numbers.
November 30, 2018
How To Count To 100 In Turkish
Compared to some other languages (we’re looking at you, French), counting in Turkish is actually refreshingly simple and straightforward.
 
There are no additional vocabulary terms to learn for the teen digits — those are essentially just “ten-one,” “ten-two,” and so on. As you continue to count higher, the same basic rule applies.

Whether you’re hard at work studying the Turkish language or you’re planning a trip to Istanbul, counting in Turkish is a valuable skill that’ll make the difference between “having the right amount of baklava” and being sorely disappointed that you didn’t order more.

From Zero To Ten

Zero — sıfır

One — bir

Two – iki

Three — üç

Four — dört

Five — beş

Six — altı

Seven — yedi

Eight — sekiz

Nine — dokuz

Ten — on

The Rest Of The Tens

Twenty — yirmi

Thirty — otuz

Forty — kırk

Fifty — elli

Sixty — altmış

Seventy — yetmiş

Eighty — seksen

Ninety — doksan

One Hundred — yüz

Putting It All Together

As mentioned above, the rules of counting in Turkish are very simple.

The numbers 11 to 19 take the construction of “ten [digit].” So eleven would be on bir; twelve would be on iki, and so on.

The rest of the two-digit numbers follow a similar rule. You simply take the ten-numbers and add the corresponding single digit. So sixty-seven would be altmış yedi; fifty-six would be elli altı.

If you’re describing a quantity of something, the numeral always comes before the noun, and the form of the noun never changes, regardless of whether there’s one or twenty.

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Steph Koyfman
Steph is a writer, lindy hopper, and astrologer. She’s also a language enthusiast who grew up bilingual and had an early love affair with books. She has mostly proved herself as a New Yorker, and she can introduce herself in Swedish thanks to Babbel. She also speaks Russian and Spanish, but she’s a little rusty on those fronts.
Steph is a writer, lindy hopper, and astrologer. She’s also a language enthusiast who grew up bilingual and had an early love affair with books. She has mostly proved herself as a New Yorker, and she can introduce herself in Swedish thanks to Babbel. She also speaks Russian and Spanish, but she’s a little rusty on those fronts.

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