How To Talk About The Weather In German

Rain, sleet, hail or snow, German weather vocab is good to know!
March 5, 2019
How To Talk About The Weather In German

Once you get past hallo in German, it can be difficult to know where to go. Conversation-wise, that is. Fortunately, there’s one topic that’s always your friend: the weather. No matter what situation you’re in, you can always rely on talking about the weather to get you out of a communicative jam. To get you ready, here’s a guide to some simple German weather vocab to rely on as you learn German. In any case, it can at least help you know what kind of weather to expect outside.

The Seasons

the season — die Jahreszeit

the spring — der Frühling

the summer — der Sommer

the autumn — der Herbst

the winter — der Winter

the rainy season — der Regenzeit

the dry season — die Trockenzeit

German Weather Vocab

the weather — das Wetter

the climate — das Klima

the degree — das Grad

the sunlight — das Sonnenlicht

the rain — der Regen

the cloud — die Wolke

the snow — der Schnee

the wind — der Wind

tropical — tropisch

the storm — der Sturm

temperate — gemäßigt

cloudy — bewölkt

the weather forecast — die Wettervorhersage

the thunder — der Donner

the lightning — der Blitz

the frost — der Frost

the blizzard — der Schneesturm

the hail — der Hagel

the drizzle — der Nieselregen

the rainbow — der Regenbogen

Simple German Weather Phrases

What is the weather like? — Wie ist das Wetter?

The sun is shining. — Die Sonne scheint.

The sky is cloudy. — Der Himmel ist bewölkt.

It stopped raining. — Der Regen hat aufgehört.

It was snowing all day. — Es hat den ganzen Tag schneit.

A strong wind is blowing. — Es weht ein sehr starker Wind.

Be careful, there’s black ice on the sidewalk. — Vorsicht, auf dem Bürgersteig ist Glatteis.

A thunderstorm is coming. — Ein Gewitter zieht auf.

German Natural Disaster Vocab

the natural disaster — die Naturkatastrophe

the earthquake — das Erdbeben

the tsunami — der Tsunami

the flood — die Überschwemmung

the drought — die Dürre

the fire — der Brand

Want to learn the rest of the language?
Author Headshot
Thomas Moore Devlin
Thomas grew up in suburban Massachusetts, and moved to New York City for college. He studied English literature and linguistics at New York University, but spent most of his time in college working for the student paper. Because of this, he has really hard opinions about AP Style. In his spare time, he enjoys reading and getting angry about things on Twitter. He's spent a lot of time trying to learn Spanish, and has learned a little German.
Thomas grew up in suburban Massachusetts, and moved to New York City for college. He studied English literature and linguistics at New York University, but spent most of his time in college working for the student paper. Because of this, he has really hard opinions about AP Style. In his spare time, he enjoys reading and getting angry about things on Twitter. He's spent a lot of time trying to learn Spanish, and has learned a little German.

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