How To Talk About Feelings In Russian

What do you do with the mad that you feel? Talk about it!
April 13, 2020
How To Talk About Feelings In Russian

Learning to talk about your emotions in any language can be tough. It can be uncomfortable to open up to people to let them know when you’re mad, sad or disappointed (though talking about the happy emotions are not quite as difficult). Talking about them in a new language, like Russian, only adds to the challenge. But when you’re learning the basics of the language, you should definitely make sure to cover the vocab for feelings in Russian.

To get you started, we compiled some of the most basic terms for sensations and feelings in Russian. If you want to hear how the words are pronounced by a native speaker, just hit the play button next to each of them!

Russian Emotions And Feelings Vocab

Russian Emotion Words

emotion — эмоция

mood — настроение

happy — счастливый

sad — грустный

excited, enthusiastic — восторженный

joy — радость

love — любовь

hate — ненависть

angry — разъярённый

to feel — чувствовать, почувствовать (imperf., perf.)

feeling — чувство

hope — надежда

depressed — подавленный

sympathy — сочувствие

lonely — одинокий

satisfied — довольный

proud — гордый

disappointed — разочарованный

upset — расстроенный

to get over — преодолевать, преодолеть (imperf., perf.)

Russian Sensation Words

sensation — ощущение

pleasure — удовольствие

hunger — голод

thirst — жажда

pain — боль

surprise — удивление

nervous — нервный

tired — усталый

fear — страх

to get bored — скучать (imperf.)

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Author Headshot
Thomas Moore Devlin
Thomas grew up in suburban Massachusetts, and moved to New York City for college. He studied English literature and linguistics at New York University, but spent most of his time in college working for the student paper. Because of this, he has really hard opinions about AP Style. In his spare time, he enjoys reading and getting angry about things on Twitter. He's spent a lot of time trying to learn Spanish, and has learned a little German.
Thomas grew up in suburban Massachusetts, and moved to New York City for college. He studied English literature and linguistics at New York University, but spent most of his time in college working for the student paper. Because of this, he has really hard opinions about AP Style. In his spare time, he enjoys reading and getting angry about things on Twitter. He's spent a lot of time trying to learn Spanish, and has learned a little German.

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