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How To Count To 100 In Swedish

How important is learning the numbers in Swedish? Let me count the ways. Here’s a guide to counting in Swedish, from noll to hundra.
Counting in Swedish represented by an older shopkeeper standing behind a counter, which has the numbers 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 printed on the front of it.

Letters and numbers form the basis for the vast majority of human communication. You probably have the Swedish alphabet down already, so now it’s time to learn how counting in Swedish works. Next time you’re in Scandinavia and need to turn left at the third fjord, or just at Ikea, counting minimalist end tables, it’s handy to know how to list and pronounce the numbers. Here’s a quick guide to counting in Swedish, starting with noll (“zero”).

Counting From Zero To Twenty In Swedish

Starting with the basics, here’s how to count from zero to twenty. Press the play button to hear how they’re pronounced.

zeronoll
oneett
twotvå
threetre
fourfyra
fivefem
sixsex
sevensju
eightåtta
ninenio
tentio
elevenelva
twelvetolv
thirteentretton
fourteenfjorton
fifteenfemton
sixteensexton
seventeensjutton
eighteenarton
nineteennitton
twentytjugo

The Rest Of The Tens

The next step is to learn the other “tens,” which form the building blocks for all numbers between twenty and one hundred. Again, with a language like Swedish, it’s helpful to hear how the words are pronounced. Press the play button to listen.

thirtytrettio
fortyfyrtio
fiftyfemtio
sixtysextio
seventysjuttio
eightyåttio
ninetynittio
one hundredhundra

Putting It All Together

Once you’ve mastered the foundational numbers above, you can begin to put it everything together to form all the numbers in between. Fortunately, Swedish makes this very easy to learn. You, quite literally, just put the numbers together. So, twenty-four is tjugofyra and eighty-two is åttiotvå. That’s all there is to it!

Ready to learn more Swedish?
Dylan Lyons

Dylan is a senior content producer, overseeing video and podcast projects for the U.S. team. He studied journalism at Ithaca College and has an MBA from NYU. Before joining Babbel, Dylan managed social media for CBS News. His interests include reading, writing, politics, and anything sweet. Dylan lives in New York City.

Dylan is a senior content producer, overseeing video and podcast projects for the U.S. team. He studied journalism at Ithaca College and has an MBA from NYU. Before joining Babbel, Dylan managed social media for CBS News. His interests include reading, writing, politics, and anything sweet. Dylan lives in New York City.

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