How To Name And Pronounce Colors In Danish

Roses are røde, violets are blå, here’s a quick guide to colors in Danish for you! In no time, you’ll know all the colors of the regnbue (rainbow).
December 10, 2018
How To Name And Pronounce Colors In Danish

If you ever happen to be in Copenhagen, you’ll likely encounter one of the most famous sites in the city: the very colorful houses. On several streets throughout the Danish capital, you’ll see painted buildings with vibrant facades. If you don’t know how to say the colors in Danish, however, you’ll never be able to describe them to non-English speakers. While this may seem like an extraneous example, there are plenty of occasions where this simple vocabulary can come in handy.

Note on usage: Some of the colors in Danish need to be adjusted depending on the noun they’re describing. There are en words (common) and et words (neuter), and some also change when describing plural nouns. The first name of each color given below is how the color words appear on their own. Also, color words in Danish come before the noun they’re describing.

The Colors In Danish

color — en farve

red — rød (common), rødt (neuter), røde (plural)

orange — orange (common, neuter, plural)

yellow — gul (common), gult (neuter), gule (plural)

green — grøn (common), grønt (neuter), grøne (plural)

blue — blå (common, plural), blåt (neuter)

light blue — lyseblå (common, plural), lyseblåt (neuter)

dark blue — mørkeblå (common, plural), mørkeblåt (neuter)

purple — lilla (common, neuter, plural)

pink — lyserød (common), lyserødt (neuter), lyserøde (plural)

brown — brun (common), brunt (neuter), brune (plural)

black — sort (common, neuter), sorte (plural)

white — hvid (common), hvidt (neuter), hvide (plural)

light — lys

dark — mørk

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Author Headshot
Thomas Moore Devlin
Thomas grew up in suburban Massachusetts, and moved to New York City for college. He studied English literature and linguistics at New York University, but spent most of his time in college working for the student paper. Because of this, he has really hard opinions about AP Style. In his spare time, he enjoys reading and getting angry about things on Twitter. He's spent a lot of time trying to learn Spanish, and has learned a little German.
Thomas grew up in suburban Massachusetts, and moved to New York City for college. He studied English literature and linguistics at New York University, but spent most of his time in college working for the student paper. Because of this, he has really hard opinions about AP Style. In his spare time, he enjoys reading and getting angry about things on Twitter. He's spent a lot of time trying to learn Spanish, and has learned a little German.

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