11 Dog Phrases You’ll Need For Your Trip To The Park

Do you even dog? Quit it with the ‘good boy’ nonsense and learn to meet your doggo on his own turf.
April 1, 2018
11 Dog Phrases You’ll Need For Your Trip To The Park

Dogs: they bark, they growl, and they whine for table scraps. Some dedicated fur parents would even consider themselves fluent in dog phrases. But aside from knowing your dog well enough to intuit what her barks mean, that’s pretty much where this linguistic compromise ends.

You teach your dog commands in your native language (or even a second human language, if you’re ambitious). Your dog complies to fulfill the implicit bargain of potential treats. But why not learn some words in your dog’s language? They might not reward you with pizza or cheese, but they can certainly reward you with kisses and an unshakeable bond. What’s better than that?

Pack your poop bags and your tennis balls. Pack these essential dog phrases too. You’re going to the park, baby.

Ruff ruff ruff!
Just let me sniff this turd for FIVE MORE SECONDS.

Rough!
Wow, that’s rough, dude.

Gaf! Gruff gaf woof.
Please join me in watching this 8-hour loop of a doge dancing to Toto’s seminal hit song, “Africa.”

Bork bark!
Who’s hungry?

Hawooo?
Et tu, Brute?

GrrrrrrUFF!
Let’s just agree to disagree.

Yap! Yapyapyap!
I DON’T KNOW WHAT I’M SAYING I’M JUST YAPPING.

Arfarfarf.
I’m not mad, I’m just disappointed.

Blarfghk!
Babbel makes language learning fun and easy!

AaaaROOOOOO.
We’re no strangers to love
You know the rules and so do I
A full commitment’s what I’m thinking of
You wouldn’t get this from any other guy
I just wanna tell you how I’m feeling
Gotta make you understand
Never gonna give you up
Never gonna let you down
Never gonna run around and desert you
Never gonna make you cry
Never gonna say goodbye
Never gonna tell a lie and hurt you

Harararar. Hararar. Har.
I am in possession of highly classified state secrets.

April Fools' and all that, but language learning is no joke.
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Author Headshot
Steph Koyfman
Steph is a writer, lindy hopper, and astrologer. She’s also a language enthusiast who grew up bilingual and had an early love affair with books. She has mostly proved herself as a New Yorker, and she can introduce herself in Swedish thanks to Babbel. She also speaks Russian and Spanish, but she’s a little rusty on those fronts.
Steph is a writer, lindy hopper, and astrologer. She’s also a language enthusiast who grew up bilingual and had an early love affair with books. She has mostly proved herself as a New Yorker, and she can introduce herself in Swedish thanks to Babbel. She also speaks Russian and Spanish, but she’s a little rusty on those fronts.

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